Thursday, March 9, 2017

Book Review: Police at the Station and They Don't Look Friendly by Adrian McKinty

Disclosure / Disclaimer: I received this ebook, free of charge,from 7th Street Books, via Edelweiss, for review purposes on this blog. No other compensation, monetary or in kind, has been received or implied for this post. Nor was I told how to post about it


This new book came out yesterday, and is a great book about Ireland's history!


Police at the Station and They Don't Look Friendly  cover



Synopsis:


Belfast 1988: A man is found dead, killed with a bolt from a crossbow in front of his house. This is no hunting accident. But uncovering who is responsible for the murder will take Detective Sean Duffy down his most dangerous road yet, a road that leads to a lonely clearing on a high bog where three masked gunmen will force Duffy to dig his own grave.

Hunted by forces unknown, threatened by Internal Affairs, and with his relationship on the rocks, Duffy will need all his wits to get out of this investigation in one piece.


Story Locale: Belfast, Northern Ireland, in 1988, during the Troubles

Series Overview: Set in Belfast, Ireland, during the time of The Troubles, Detective Sean Duffy—a Catholic cop in the primarily protestant RUC—investigates a series of crimes amidst the sectarian violence.



Review:

I think this book takes the award for longest title in the series, and of most books for this year so far! But I imagine, it was hard to determine a title for this book, as it offers a very unique take on the history of policing in Ireland, the Troubles and how history can not be erased. It is the 6th book of the series and Duffy is not the same man from book 5. Events in work and life have allowed him to look at life differently. His current case is the perfect example, instead of taking options one would expect, he works outside the system to try to find a solution to the troubles that seem to be coming at him from all sides. And what he finds it a shock not only to his team, but to the reader. This is definitely a page turner of a book, and I think probably the best of the series, for truly making the reader feel the issues of Ireland and how history doesn't change overnight because political honchos say it does. It's a great read for the month, and not one to be missed!


About the Author:


Adrian McKinty is the author of eighteen novels, including the acclaimed Detective Sean Duffy novels. Rain Dogs is a 2017 Edgar® Award nominee. Gun Street Girl was shortlisted for the Anthony, Ned Kelly, and Edgar® Awards. The Cold Cold Ground won the Spinetingler Award. I Hear the Sirens in the Street won the Barry Award and was shortlisted for the Ned Kelly Award. In the Morning I’ll Be Gone won the Ned Kelly Award and was selected by the American Library Association as one of the top-10 crime fiction novels of 2014. McKinty is also the author of the standalone historical The Sun Is God. Born and raised in Carrickfergus, Northern Ireland, McKinty was called “the best of the new generation of Irish crime novelists” in the Glasgow Herald.

Check out his website for more info on Adrian and his books!

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