Friday, August 21, 2015

Book Review: The Self-Help Guide for Teens with Dyslexia: Useful Stuff You May Not Learn at School by Alais Winton

Disclosure / Disclaimer: I received this ebook, free of charge, froJessica Kingsley Publishers, for review purposes on this blog. No other compensation, monetary or in kind, has been received or implied for this post. Nor was I told how to post about it

The Self-Help Guide for Teens with Dyslexia cover

As I told you on Monday, we had spent the last part of the past academic year, checking Miss Grace for different developmental issues, and one of them was dyslexia, so when I saw this book, I wanted to check it out and share it with you!


As Alais Winton knows, having dyslexia doesn't mean you're not bright; like her, you might just need a different way of looking at things. In this book, she lets you in on the learning techniques which work for her, and which you may not be taught at school. 

Offering solutions to common problems students with dyslexia face, Alais describes tried-and-tested techniques for succeeding with reading, spelling, memorising information and time management, and even a simple method to ensure you never misplace your learning tools (such as pencils and books) again. The strategies are ideal for use in the run-up to exams, helping you to become more organised, less stressed and better prepared. 

This is a must-read pocket guide for students with dyslexia aged 11 to 18, and will also be a helpful source of ideas for teachers, SENCOs and parents of teens with dyslexia.


Parents have a hard enough time when kids get diagnosed with a learning disability early in life, but for those who have pre-teens that get diagnosed, there is a bigger learning curve for both your child and yourself. This book is wonderful at helping to bridge that gap. It is a MUST read for parents of pre-teens and teens with dyslexia- it really offers some great learning tricks and advice that I had not come across, when I did all my research, when we were considering that Miss Grace might have dyslexia. Some are so simple like covering printed materials with a yellow film, and others may require some help to learn to master them, like mind maps and word games. The author also offers suggestions are similar learning issues that may or may not come with dyslexia, to be on the lookout for.

The book is excellent at sharing how learning is different, and how children with dyslexia see things differently when learning, to help parents understand HOW to help them, in a way that really does help them. The book is a great reminder that every child is different, but no matter what, they CAN learn, just in their own unique way. And that is something to be celebrated! 

About the Author:

Alais hails from Haverfordwest, England, and wasn’t diagnosed with dyslexia until her second year in university. In school she excelled at drama and practical subjects but struggled with reading and writing. She has since gone on to become a successful lecturer at Pembrokeshire College and even teaches teachers how to teach, This is her second book on dyslexia.

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